Wednesday, August 22, 2007

Cheese Please


Yet another friend was leaving the office and I decided one of his last meals should not be in the canteen.

So I treated him to lunch at the Southern Minorities restaurant down the block from our office.

We originally picked light dishes -- diced tofu with tomatoes and green peppers; and beans stir-fried with small potatoes. And for a dash of spice, we each had a small bowl of dan dan mian, noodles in a spicy broth with peanuts.

But we picked one of the most deadliest desserts on the caloric scale -- deep-fried goat cheese.

Six lightly deep-fried slabs of cheese were served with a small dish of sweetened condensed milk.

I took one piece, dipped it in the thick, creamy sauce. And once I bit into it, it was actually two thin slabs of cheese with dessicated coconut inside. It was such a delightful surprise, combining two different textures in each bite.

My friend, a cheese fan, was in absolute heaven, throwing his intention of eating more healthy out the window. He even ate four pieces, as I was done after two.

And in the afternoon I could still feel those two slabs of deep-fried goat cheese settling nicely in my stomach.

After work, I went for a swim in a vain attempt to work off the dessert!

4 comments:

Larry said...

I must say that it's not usual for Chinese to eat cheese as it is not part of their diet. On the other hand, I suppose it's the young generation that has taken a liking to cheese.

ks said...

in northern and northwest china goat and lamb are staple diet. goat cheese is quite popular. but how do you fry cheese? the temperature in boiling oil is so high the cheese would melt, would it?

Anita said...

that sounds absolutely delicious, though i would be in a food coma afterwards.

Jason said...

It's possible to deep fry anything. In the U.S., they deep fry chocolate bars even. The trick is to chill it beforehand and not let it fry for too long. If you par-cook the food beforehand, then the frying part doesn't have to be that long, leaving the interior relatively cool and intact.